Ami's SOA Civil War Quilts: Era, Commemorative, Inspired


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AshleyMel

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There have only been a few times in my life where I have had genuine, actually goose bumps - ya know, my marriage, the birth of my daughter, that kind of thing - and then this! I was amazed she actually let me handle them! I was also amazed at how sturdy there were! One would think, being 150+ years old, the fabric would be brittle, thin and falling apart! Nope! Some were more delicate than others. More worn. I was extra careful with those. These were real. Somehow more real (no disrespect to the incredible quilts and quilters there) then anything I had seen at the quilt show I had just come from. My friend (who is a Viking trained instructor and excellent seamstress herself) came over and looked over them with me and offered comments. Each one stitched to ridiculous precision. Different binding techniques, probably depending on the amount of fabric available and the preferred method of the family. The appliqué, very time consuming! Oh my! I can not tell you how much experiencing these quilts meant to me.
Each one has a story! I'm going to try to see if I can get either one of my quilting club to book her for presentation and classes!
 
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JPK Huson 1863

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Ah! Quilts in time for winter! Nothing better to sleep under. Anyone have trouble sleeping, try old, cotton quilts, honest! Get rid of all the polyester, polyester filled comforters, buy these old treasures. No idea why, old, layered quilts, just cotton in winter do better than the priciest duvet.
 

USS ALASKA

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http://www.patriotledger.com/blogs/20180111/civil-war-soldiers-quilts-at-hingham-historical-society

Civil War soldiers’ quilts at Hingham Historical Society

...Weeks’ first book, Civil War Quilts, published in 2012, has 170 photos and tells the stories of 14 Civil War quilts and the women who made them. Her next book will be out soon...

...From the web site
Quilting101.com: “Women held a paramount role during the American Civil War. Back in the 1850s the government did not provide for the military the same way they do now and it was often up to the women to provide clothing and bedding for the soldiers. This experience alone is said to have been one of the largest forces of confidence amongst women and what propelled the push for the right to vote!”...

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
 

chellers

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JPK Huson 1863

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Beautiful, Annie. Thank you for posting.

18 pages and counting of pricked fingers we'll never know about! There's a post on one of the Met pages, I think just their red and white collection? Maybe it was temporary? You've probably seen it. Staggering! If it's intended to emphasis both design and scope, nice job! Love to have someone guess-timate hours on display in it, too.

Have had several shots at quilting. Far too ants in the pants. Anyone who achieved these levels of needlework has all my sincere respect.

From the days before we knew George Washington drove 4-wheel drive cars, slept on ultra-firm mattresses and slashed prices on both as a birthday present to himself, we thought his celebration huge enough to come up with efforts like this crazy-cool quilt.
 

chellers

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Nunda%2BLodge%2BChicagoHistSoc.jpg


Quilt known as the Nunda Lodge Quilt
Collection of the Chicago Historical Society

This flag-strewn quilt gives us much narrative information.

"It's Old.Abe
Forever"

Illinois 1865
From the Tomlinson Family of Montclair, New Jersey

For more, please scroll down the link at: civilwarquilts.blogspot.com/2018/03/its-old-abe-forever-nunda-lodge-quilt.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+CivilWarQuilts+%28Civil+War+Quilts%29
 

USS ALASKA

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Quilt show in Meadville focuses on Civil War area history
  • By Lorri Drumm Meadville Tribune
  • 11 min ago


5ad11789d8673.image.jpg

Judith Stoll, a member of the Northwest Pennsylvania Quilt Study Group and the board of directors of the Crawford County Historical Society, points out a section of a Civil War era quilt that was blackened by a coal-burning stove.

SHANNON ROAE/Meadville Tribune




A rare opportunity to take a step back in time in a place where the creaking floors have weathered centuries of footsteps, the paintings are as large as the walls and the quilts on the beds once served a purpose other than decor is coming to Meadville.

The Northwest Pennsylvania Quilt Study Group hosts an event April 21 at the Baldwin-Reynolds House Museum, 639 Terrace St., that focuses on quilts of the Civil War era.

Approximately 30 vintage and reproduction quilts from that era (1850 to 1880) will be on display, according to Judith Stoll, a member of the study group and the board of directors of the Crawford County Historical Society. The quilts are from private collections of study group members and are not often available for public viewing.


During the American Civil War (1861 to 1865), women's groups and church groups from both the North and South sprang into action to supply needs for the soldiers, according to Stoll.

At the time, women were forbidden by cultural norms and law from joining the armies. They “fought” the war and healed its wounds primarily from the home front.

Unlike today when the U.S. government equips its troops, during the Civil War families and communities provided many of soldiers’ necessities. Mothers, wives, daughters and sisters raided their cupboards for bedding, including handmade quilts, which kept their men warm and reminded them of home.

The quilts were also used to keep soldiers clean and bury them, according to Stoll.

As they recently prepared for the display, Stoll and fellow quilt study group member Jill Meszaros pointed out some of the history of the fabric in the quilts that visitors to the event will discover. Stoll mentioned a specific block shape that indicates the quilt came from Pennsylvania. Meszaros said some of the black tones that migrated into orange fabric on one quilt were created by a reaction from a coal stove.

Those who attend the event should arrive at 10 a.m. for coffee, tea and light refreshments on the first floor of the mansion that dates to 1840s and was once the home of Supreme Court Justice Henry Baldwin.

There will be a tour of the quilt show followed by a series of mini-lectures on topics including the role of the U.S. Sanitary Commission, quilt styles, fabrics and patterns of the era and potholder quilts.


The Sanitary Commission was a private relief agency created by federal legislation on June 18, 1861, to support sick and wounded soldiers of the U.S. Army during the Civil War.

Lunch will be served at noon. A guided tour of the quilt show is from 1:30 to 2:30.

The event is limited to 40 people. The cost to attend is $35, which includes the guided tour, lectures and lunch.

Reservations are required.

For reservations: Call Stoll at 398-4365 or Meszaros at 398-8719.

Lorri Drumm can be reached at 724-6370 or by email at lorrid@meadvilletribune.com.

http://www.meadvilletribune.com/new...cle_e0296ce6-3f5b-11e8-8b82-3b22fe8a8f0b.html

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
 
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