Which woman was most valuable to the CSA/USA Army?

Which woman was most valuable to the CSA/USA Army?

  • Nurse

    Votes: 23 92.0%
  • Soldier

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Spy

    Votes: 2 8.0%
  • Vivandiere

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    25
  • Poll closed .

JPK Huson 1863

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#41
Thank you CC! You are really the best! I think I am just feeling kinda protective of the all ladies lately! No offense to the thread but after the 'ol crazy Mary Todd Lincoln discussions that have popped up here and there I just feel a little...I don't know. :frantic:

You are smart. You are kind. You are special.
May we all never forget it no matter what our role or our place in history!

If you see one I missed, please let me know? May have noticed, poor M.L. is a bit of a crusade with me. Plus the whole ' crazy ' and female thing is an ancient, time honored method of controlling we hysterics. Upset? Have an issue? Angry over injustice? Object to being vilified ( Mary )? Hysterical and crazy - well,' she' can't vote, that's how universally kooky we've been.

It's actually not a bad position from which to view History, you know? Protective. Without going up in smoke or being embittered, it's just, plain ok, remembering this stuff. And that we did really, really, really well.

And honest, you're so on the right track. On quite a few things.
 

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JPK Huson 1863

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#42
I have read many soldiers diaries from both sides...these guys share some intensely personal stuff on occasion. It's quite humbling really, knowing 100+ years later under somewhat different circumstances....I am no different than they were. :D

Does loneliness come through? You do wonder sometimes if the all-guy, all-the-time, camp life made them a little batty. Men and women do awfully well together because we're supposed to, I think, you know? I mean, it's always been a puzzle why we complain about how different we are when it's all so enjoyable- comprehensively. You could see soldiers just, plain missing having women around. Love letters exchanged in the war are all saying the same thing. I miss you, dear.
 

JPK Huson 1863

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#43
When I first read the title of this thread, I thought you were looking for the name of one individual woman. Now, that's an impossible task! Nancy Hanks Lincoln? -- No, Military: Hannah Simpson Grant? And, the Confederate army wouldn't have lasted near as long as it did without Anne Carter Lee! Well, mothers are the most important people we have. I'd choose mine over any general or president!

But, I'll go with nurses, and not simply by weight of numbers, but by actual person to person impact on soldiers' lives.

jno

Huge point. Still conflicted? So hard to put my finger on and you cautioned me a long time ago rambles are not helpful- I don't know. Back there with the King's horse, this time with ladies across the board. Came across this in Leslie's, begun pre-war, had no clue! @Pat Young , more NYC crazy huge, dynamic, awesome stuff!
ladies of ny2.JPG

ladies of ny.JPG
 
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#45
Of course with the "soiled doves", there was the "usual business" going on with the guys.....but there were quite a few who visited these ladies just for companionship or to be held....strictly platonic. :smile:
After reading this post, I thought of a scene in a Clint Eastwood movie...Unforgiven, I think...where a prostitute mentioned she once had a customer who just wanted to be with her while she hung laundry. (Perhaps it reminded him of his wife.)

You Eastwood fans, do let me know if I have the wrong movie! Anyway, I often think of that while hanging laundry. I remember finding it very sweet and a little heartbreaking.
 

JohnW.

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#46
After reading this post, I thought of a scene in a Clint Eastwood movie...Unforgiven, I think...where a prostitute mentioned she once had a customer who just wanted to be with her while she hung laundry. (Perhaps it reminded him of his wife.)

You Eastwood fans, do let me know if I have the wrong movie! Anyway, I often think of that while hanging laundry. I remember finding it very sweet and a little heartbreaking.
A similar scene took place in the movie "Young Guns" when they stopped in a town on their way to Mexico. :D
 

gary

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#47
Female nurses saved lives. Recovery rates or lives saved because of a female presence was higher than in all male hospitals. Simple morale building things like a smile, voice, reading or writing a letter, reading the bible did wonders for the injured men.
 
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#48
Me too, I tough the pool was refer to a single character more than a category. Anyway, pool is closed and so i can't vote, but surely nurses would has been the choise.
Maybe can interest, BBC historical magazine - the american civi war, made a selection called 'the 5 woman of the american civil war', listing :
QUEEN OF THE CONFEDERATE COURT MARY BOYKIN CHESNUT was part of the Confederate court in Richmond, scribbling the breaking news of battles and back-biting among Jefferson Davis’s intimate circle. Her memoir, first published nearly 19 years after her death, is the most widely cited civil war journal because of its engrossing prose and vivid evocation of the southern white psyche. Chesnut also provided tart critiques of her fellow slaveholders. As for her own foibles: she might have recognised them, but she really couldn’t comment.
FIRST LADY OF THE UNION MARY LINCOLN, the southern-born bride of Abraham Lincoln, found herself in a precarious position when her husband blockaded the Confederacy in April 1861. Isolation in the White House, especially after her son Willie’s death in 1862, destabilised the First Lady. She devoted herself to her husband’s health and hospital charity, but the strain of war took its toll. The couple were happy when the Confederacy finally surrendered and their son Robert arrived home. Mary’s happiness was cut short by her husband’s assassination on 14 April 1865.
HEROINE BEHIND ENEMY LINES HARRIET TUBMAN was an ex-slave who escaped north before the war. She became a heroic leader in the Underground Railroad, a network of people who helped fugitive slaves escape. She headed back south behind enemy lines once Lincoln declared war in April 1861. In the summer of 1863, Tubman engineered a raid up the Combahee River, smuggling more than 700 runaway slaves to safety and freedom. Her battle for a military pension would last for decades, but finally in 1899 Tubman’s service and accomplishments gained recognition.
ANGEL OF THE BATTLEFIELD CLARA BARTON was a Massachusetts-born educator who collected medicine and food to send to Union soldiers. She campaigned for direct access, and by the second summer of the war she took supplies directly to the front, and became known as the ‘Angel of the Battlefield’. After the war, she devoted her energies to locating Union soldiers who had not returned to their families. Through her efforts more than 20,000 soldiers were cleared from the missing list. She went on to found the American Red Cross.
MASQUERADED AS A CONFEDERATE SOLDIER LORETA JANETA VELASQUEZ defied the conventional path carved out for her. Ignoring the wishes of her husband, Velasquez decided to disguise herself as a man to serve in the Confederate army. At the battle of Shiloh, she was wounded and the army doctor treating her discovered she was a woman. Next, she headed to Richmond to offer her services as a spy. Her memoir, The Woman in Battle (1876) detailed her struggles on and off the battlefield.

Through Samantha James, the young author of this blog historicaldiariesblog.wordpress.com i could know the story of Debora Sampson, which surely everybody you know (for who doesn't, she was a continental soldier), but we are during the revolutionary period, anyway an oustanding story .. i mean, oustanding how she survived, and how many times !
 

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